How is my property value determined?
The initial and most important step of the valuation process is to visit the property and verify the accuracy of the data already in the appraisal system. As this is being done, other staff members will be building the 2003 Schedule of Values by researching and analyzing the values already established from sales, building costs, and income information. The Schedule of Values must be adopted by the Scotland County Board of Commissioners and is used to appraise all real property in the County.

When your property is being appraised, the appraiser considers several important factors, which include but are not limited to year built, size, condition, desirability, utility, zoning, and quality of construction, materials, and location. When the valuation process is complete, your property should appraise at a value comparable to properties within your neighborhood boundary, plus or minus adjustments for different factors. The 2003 revaluation is a Computer Assisted Mass Appraisal of all property in Scotland County, and the end result should be uniformity and equalization of values within each neighborhood throughout the county.

Show All Answers

1. How is my property value determined?
2. What purpose does reappraisal serve?
3. What is the difference between real property and personal property?
4. When will the new values come into affect?
5. What if I do not agree with my property value?
6. What documentation would be helpful if I appeal?
7. What if I am still not satisfied?
8. What if I have more questions or would like someone from Revaluation or the Tax Office to speak to our group?